Google’s Ad Viewability Research: 56% of Ads are Not Seen

Image source: ThinkWithGoogle.com

Image source: ThinkWithGoogle.com

In its recent study published last week, Google identified five factors that impact viewability of online display ads. The factors are 1) State of publisher viewability; 2) Page position matters…; 3) …So does ad size; 4) Above the fold ≠always viewable; 5) Viewability varies across industry.

While none of the factors above are very shocking, some of the statistics Google released are surprising. The most controversial stat is that 56% of impressions served on Google display platforms are not seen.

Based on Google’s report, here are some key takeaways for marketers to ensure the best viewability for their ads.

Firstly, know the industry standard for viewable impressions. A display ad is considered viewable when 50% of the ad’s pixels are in view on the screen for a minimum of one second (according to Media Rating Council).

Secondly, pay attention to page position and ad size. Google found hat the most viewable ad position is right above the fold, not at the top of the page. Vertical ad units are the most visible because they are visible for a longer period as a user scrolls up or down a page.

Marketers should also be aware of maladvertising: malware that creates fraudulent clicks. If something seems odd in your reporting (for example, hundreds of thousands of impressions but zero clicks), your campaigns could be a victim of this type of fraud.

For smart marketers who are paying attention to results, and only spending with publishers who deliver those results, the issue of ad visibility should not be overwhelming. But it is an important factor in our changing marketing landscape in which display ads are recognized as less and less reliable.

Further reading:

-Posted by Elizabeth Pace

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